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Keeper

Keeper 101 | Enterprise - How to Create Nodes in Keeper Enterprise

Keeper's node architecture scales to any sized organization. At the highest level of our organization structure are nodes. Nodes are used to organize your users into distinct groupings, which can have their own sets of roles, teams, two-factor authentication, enforcement policies and provisioning methods. By default, the top level parent node, or root node is set to your organization name, and all additional nodes are created underneath the Root Node. Smaller organizations may choose to administer Keeper at a single level, meaning no additional nodes are created.

Keeper 101 - How to Create Your Keeper Account

To create your Keeper Account, visit keepersecurity.com and hover your cursor over the “Login” dropdown and select Web Vault, then click Create an Account. Enter your email address and click Next. You will be prompted to set and confirm a master password. Don’t forget your master password! Since this password will unlock all of your other passwords in your Keeper Vault, it is critical that you set a strong master password using upper and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols.

Keeper 101 - How to Create Your Keeper Account on iOS

Signing up for Keeper's iOS mobile app is easy. Simply visit the App Store on your device, search for Keeper, and install “Keeper Password Manager”. Once the download is complete, tap Open to launch Keeper. Tap Create Account to get started. Enter your email address and tap Next. You will be prompted to set and confirm a master password. Don’t forget your master password! Since this password will unlock all of your other passwords in your Keeper Vault, it is critical that you set a strong master password using upper and lowercase letters, numbers and symbols.

Password Spraying vs Credential Stuffing

Password spraying and credential stuffing have a lot in common, but the main difference is in the way the attack is executed. With credential stuffing, the cybercriminal already has a set of verified login credentials, whereas, with password spraying, the cybercriminal has to guess the login credentials by matching a list of usernames with a commonly used password.

Six Best Practices for Secrets Management

A secret refers to the non-human privileged credentials used by systems and applications to access services and IT resources containing highly sensitive information and privileged systems. Secrets allow applications to transmit data and request services from each other. Examples of secrets include access tokens, SSH keys, non-human privileged account credentials, cryptographic keys and API keys.

How Weak Passwords Lead to Ransomware Attacks

Weak passwords can lead to ransomware attacks because they can be easily compromised through password-cracking techniques, allowing cybercriminals to gain access to an organization’s network where they can then inject ransomware. Often, when people think of the causes of ransomware infections, their first thought is it was caused by a phishing email.

How Is Ransomware Delivered?

Some of the most common ways ransomware is delivered are through phishing emails, drive-by downloads, exploit kits and RDP exploits. According to Malwarebytes’ 2024 State of Malware report, in 2023 the number of known ransomware attacks increased by 68% from the previous year. The report also found that the largest ransom demanded in 2023 was $80 million.

Seven Types of Spoofing Attacks and How To Avoid Them

Cybercriminals often use spoofing attacks to disguise themselves as a familiar face or legitimate business to trick people into revealing sensitive information. They use a variety of techniques such as creating fake websites or emails. Some of the different types of spoofing attacks include call spoofing, email spoofing, website spoofing and IP spoofing. Continue reading to learn more about spoofing attacks, the seven common types of spoofing attacks and how to stay protected from them.

Are Biometrics Safer Than Passwords?

Biometrics are technically safer than passwords because they’re harder for cybercriminals to compromise or steal. Besides being more secure, biometrics are also phishing-resistant and more convenient to use than passwords. Read on to learn more about biometrics and why they’re considered to be more secure than passwords.